Category: Mind Uploading

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Neuroscience – and the Future of Humanity – Interview with Ken Hayworth

Recently I did a three part interview with renowned neuroscientist Kenneth Hayworth that went for 4.5 hours. So strap yourselves into your interview appreciation chairs and glue your eyes to the screen. It was very informative and fun, I hope you enjoy it 🙂

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Four Statements About the Future

1. Chemical brain preservation is a technology that may soon be validated to inexpensively preserve the key features of our memories and identity at our biological death.
2. If either chemical or cryogenic brain preservation can be validated to reliably store retrievable and useful individual mental information, these medical procedures should be made available in all societies as an option at biological death.
3. If computational neuroscience, microscopy, scanning, and robotics technologies continue to improve at their historical rates, preserved memories and identity may be affordably reanimated by being “uploaded” into computer simulations, beginning well before the end of this century.
4. In all societies where a significant minority (let’s say 100,000 people) have done brain preservation at biological death, significant positive social change will result in those societies today, regardless of how much information is eventually recovered from preserved brains.

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SIM, Emulation, Structure & Function

Video and Transcript of the interview conducted with Dr. Randal A. Koene by Adam A. Ford at Fitzroy Gardens, Melbourne, 16 August, 2012. (The interview was part of the events surrounding the Singularity Summit Australia 2012.)

SIM stands for Substrate-Independent Minds. It is the notion that you can take the functions that are going on inside of our brain that produce mind and have them carried out in different kinds of implementations…

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Transhumanists Invade Space Development Conference!

Last weekend (Sunday May 28) I spent the day at the annual conference of the National Space Society — giving a talk, taking in the other talks, and generally absorbing the space-y energy. I came away with the clear impression that at some point in the not too distant future — in particular, once the cost of launch is decreased a fair bit — we’re going to see an incredible explosion of commercial, scientific and recreational activity in near space.