Changing climate likely to make ‘super weed’ even more powerful

Harsh Bais (left), University of Delaware assistant professor of plant and soil sciences, and Thimmaraju Rudrappa, a former UD postdoctoral researcher who is now a research scientist at DuPont, examine... Photo credit: Kathy F. Atkinson/University of DelawareResearchers at the University of Delaware have discovered a new reason why the tall, tasseled reed Phragmites australis is one of the most invasive plants in the United States.

The UD research team found that Phragmites delivers a one-two chemical knock-out punch to snuff out its victims, and the poison becomes even more toxic in the presence of the sun’s ultraviolet rays.

The study, which is published in the June issue of the scientific journal Plant Signaling & Behavior, is believed to be the first to report the effects of UV-B radiation on plant allelopathy, the production of toxins by a plant to ward off encroachment by neighboring plants.

Read Original Article

Leave a Reply