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Criticism

The Asilomar AI Principles Should Include Transparency About the Purpose and Means of Advanced AI Systems

The Asilomar AI Principles Should Include Transparency About the Purpose and Means of Advanced AI Systems

author Bill Hibbard The recently published set of 23 Asilomar AI Principles are intended to guide the development of artificial intelligence (AI). Two principles, 7 and 8, call for transparency about the reasons for harm caused by AI and transparency about explaining judicial decisions made by AI. While helpful, these two principles are much too narrow. Principles 19 and 20 describe the unlimited ...

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Frankenstein Conquers the World

Frankenstein Conquers the World

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein has given us much to chew on, ranging across gender politics and history, including symbolic, political, psychological and social themes.

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Michael Jackson: Posthuman

Michael Jackson: Posthuman

Mark Ryden’s art for Michael Jackson’s 1991 album Dangerous. Augusto Podrido/Flickr, CC BY-NC-ND The album cover for Michael Jackson’s album Dangerous was painted by American pop-surrealist artist Mark Ryden. In it, he depicts a world in which the boundaries between human and animal, living and dead, whole and part, and celestial and terrestrial have been crossed and fused. Surrealist painters lik...

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Kevin LaGrandeur on Posthumanism and Transhumanism

Kevin LaGrandeur on Posthumanism and Transhumanism

Kevin has provided a typically engaging gloss on the difference between posthumanism and transhumanism over at the IEET site. I don’t fundamentally disagree with his account of transhumanism (though I think he needs to emphasize its fundamentally normative character) but the account of posthumanism he gives here has some shortcomings.

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The Revolt Against Transhumanism

The Revolt Against Transhumanism

Having introduced transhumanists ideas to university students over the years, I am familiar with typical objections: if we don’t die the world will become overpopulated; not having a body would be yucky; this is all science fiction; lots of things can go wrong; technology is bad; death makes life meaningful; immortality would be boring; etc.

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Jaron Lanier on Transhumanism

Jaron Lanier on Transhumanism

I first encountered Jaron Lanier’s work when I taught his essay “One-Half of A Manifesto” to computer science students at the University of Texas at Austin. In it he argues, against most of his fellow computer scientists, that humans are not digital or biological computers and they are unlikely to be replaced by computers anytime soon. Lanier rejects what he calls “cybernetic totalism.”

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