Who Wants To Live The Longest?

· December 21, 2012

The health extension salon in Y Combinator at 320 Pioneer Way, Mountain View, CA, meets weekly to discuss and implement projects assigned in 4 different actions groups (Biotechnology, Branding&Influence, Fundraising, and .  If you missed out on this exciting chance to advance longevity via science, caught up on some lectures and propose new project ideas at http://healthextension.co/

The most exciting finding revealed in the Health Extension Salon was founder Joe Betts-LaCroix’s survey results on public opinion to the question “Do you want to live forever?”.  In the original survey at whenim164.com, less than 4% of respondents wanted to live forever!  Most people would rather chose to die at 80 or 120!

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But what happens when we change the question to “Do you want to live forever if you could be mentally and physically the same as your 20s”?  40% want to live forever!  In fact, Aubrey de Grey’s “SENS” plan for curing aging is intended to rejuvenate the body on the cellular level, not extend life in a decrepit, aged state.  A grave misunderstanding has hindered funding for rejuvenation against aging!

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Here are other correlations found in the data based on demographics of the respondents.  Every factor not listed here did not have a significant correlation with desire for increased lifespan.  This includes seemingly influential factors such as religious background.

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People with PTSD and depression are more likely to desire to living forever.  Why is that?  Does depression spur hope for an eternal existence that seems improbable?

Does “terror management theory” explain that most “happy-go-lucky” people have accepted death in order to focus more on this life, and only the depressed pursue a glimmering hope of immortality?

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Those who are specifically “disinterested” in science by far do not want to live forever (no doubt, less than 2% used such a seemingly pejorative term to describe themselves).  However, moderately interested people seem to want to live forever just as much as science freaks.

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Perceiving yourself as “Perfectly healthy” mattered greatly.  Its as if living longer was more about “living healthier longer”, and successful hypochondriacs fit the bill.

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Unsurprisingly, the depressed don’t want to live forever.

 

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Most of the people surveyed were young to middle-aged.  Interest in living forever assuming both peak physical and mental health peaked at age 40.  Perhaps at 40 we begin to age to the point where to wish our bodies could one day gain the vigor or our 20s?


Want to live forever? Join Jason in the Eternal Life Club on Facebook.

This article originally appeared on Jason’s site here: http://xulifeextension.com/wordpress/?page_id=800

3 Responses

  1. Rashid Mostafa says:

    Most people that I talk to have not thought about the possibility of the combination of long life and good health. Some have even had a hostile reaction to the thought. I don’t have any answer as to why this is. We fantasize about all sorts of improvements to human society, but are generally quite fatalistic when it comes to the subject of dying.
    And I don’t know where the statistics about race and gender of transhumanists come from. I am S Asian with a Muslim background. I don’t see a white bias in the ideas and philosophy a transhumanism.

  2. Yosarian says:

    Whenever I have this conversation with someone, if they say “No, I don’t want to live forever”, I usually respond with “Well, literally ‘forever’ is likely impossible anyway, but how would you like to live to the age of 300 with the body of a 21 year old and then die in a freak skydiving accident?”

  3. Dutchcon says:

    Sure I want to live forever.
    But not with Facebook.